food recipes

Grilled salmon with lemon and garlic sauce

Grilled salmon with lemon and garlic sauce

Learn how to make restaurant-quality grilled salmon at home using these simple techniques Make a crunchy golden crust in two ways: with or without the peel Finish it up with an easy lemon garlic butter sauce for a quick, hearty meal .

 

Pan-searing is my favorite way to cook salmon fillets. It results in an irresistible texture – a crunchy surface with juicy, juicy bits underneath. A few tricks will achieve this: dry the fish well before frying, press the meat into the hot oil, and allow a crust to form.

You can use any type of salmon, however, I prefer Scottish or Atlantic. Slices tend to be at least 1 inch thick and are better for crust formation because they take longer to heat up to the center. They are also rich in healthy fats and omega-3 fatty acids. When the fat simmers in the hot skillet, it coats the meat and maintains its moisture and flavor.

 

Peeling the skin: How to peel salmon fillets

Place a cutting board near the edge of the counter. Lay the salmon skin-side down, near the edge. This makes it easy to run the knife along the board without hitting your knuckles.

Hold the knife at a slight downward angle to prevent slicing. Starting at the end of the tail or the corner of a slice cut in the middle, use a long deboning knife, utility knife, or chef’s knife to cut through the meat and skin closely. With your other hand, hold the tip of the skin while using slow spreading motions.

Skin-On: Remove the skin from the slices

It’s safe to eat cooked scales, although I prefer removing as much of it as possible. Check this by sliding the dull spine of a knife or the edge of a spoon in both directions. This will help determine the direction of the scales. Hold the edge of the faded spine crosswise at a 45-degree angle against the skin. Scrape the blade through the skin until the scales come off.

 

Cut the fillets into pieces

If possible, buy middle-cut salmon fillets. This will give thick cuts that are consistent in size and allow for even cooking. Cut the salmon into equal-sized slices, about 2 inches wide. If the fish is too long, snip off some of the thinner sides and discard. However, this part gets very crunchy, so keep it connected if you like.

Dry the surface as much as possible

Drying the surface of the fish with paper towels is critical to the fish’s fragility and safety. The more moisture is removed, the faster the meat or skin will turn golden brown. The water will evaporate, making it take longer to become brittle. Also, if any water falls into the hot oil, it will explode and splash. So be careful when adding fish to the pan.

seasoning fillet

I tend to keep it simple with salt and pepper. Sprinkle both sides generously to enhance the delicious taste of the neutral-tasting pulp. I do this just before burning because the salt attracts moisture to the surface. If necessary, dry again if they have not cooked within 10 minutes.

 

pan selection

A thick stainless steel skillet, cast iron skillet, or nonstick skillet works well with grilled salmon. However, stainless steel is my top choice and is often used in restaurants for its ability to distribute heat quickly and evenly. The high-quality versions have three layers containing aluminum, a fast conductor and heat spreader, bonded between stainless steel that retains heat but emits slowly and steadily.

Stainless steel pans need to be preheated before adding oil. You can’t see it, but the surface is really porous, and when it’s heated up those pores shrink. This only takes a few minutes over medium heat. To check this, you can add a few drops of water, it is ready if it remains intact and slides along the surface without bubbles and evaporation. Then wipe off the water and add the oil.

Alternatively, an adhesive is a great option for those who have tried the method first, it removes the sticking agent, and you can really focus on the color and hit the right degree of doneness.

 

oil selection

Use frying oil with a smoke point of 375°F (191°C) and above. The fish will be cooked at around 177°C, so it’s a good idea to have a heat stock. Grape seeds, canola, vegetables, avocado, and regular or light (not extra-virgin) olive oil are good choices. I prefer olive or avocado oil for its neutral flavor, especially since I use it in my sauce. Heat the oil until blinking, but not smoking. The latter is a sign that it is very hot and that it is decomposing.

Do not add cold salmon to the pan

Adding cold food directly from the refrigerator to the pan will cause it to stick more. It lowers the temperature drastically and causes the pores in the pan to open instead of staying narrow. Leave the salmon at room temperature for at least 10 minutes before cooking.

Skinless salmon roasting

Slide the skinless meat side down for a crisp golden surface. My chef instructor at culinary school told us we should let the fish cook until it reached 75-80% on the thickest part and then flip it over. Depending on the thickness, the process takes about 4 to 5 minutes.

The neat thing is that you can actually see the fish turning from transparent to opaque at the edges, so pay close attention. This provides enough time for a thick crust to form on the surface. Flip, then continue to cook until the fillets are medium-dipped (slightly translucent in the center) to medium-dipped (mostly opaque and flaky).

 

Skin frying salmon

The key to browning the crunchy texture is to cook the salmon skin-side down first so that it’s fried in oil longer. You will notice that the skin will start to shrink the moment it hits the pan. Squeezing it with a fish spoon instantly reduces the amount of twisting or curling. This will keep it flat and evenly fried.

Skin is full of collagen and omega-3 fatty acids, and it takes a little longer to change texture compared to meat. This process will take about 5 to 6 minutes. You should be able to cut through the leather easily with a fork. I serve this type of fillet skin-side up on a plate which prevents the skin from getting wet while sitting in the sauce.

Make a quick pan sauce

After frying the fish in the pan, there will be fat from the salmon and parts of the savory aftertaste from the browning of the protein. Don’t skimp on the pan, use those great drip to make the sauce. Saute minced garlic, lemon zest and fresh lemon juice until fragrant. To thicken the texture, turn off the heat and whisk in the cold butter. This keeps the sauce emulsified so it sticks to the fish. Dill and chopped parsley add aroma and taste to the dish of fresh herbs.

serve this with

  • Sauteed green beans
  • Grilled asparagus
  • healthy quinoa

 

Prevent salmon from sticking to the pan

Do not move the slices once they reach the pan. A cold piece of fish will change the surface temperature of your stainless pan instantly. This increases the size of the pan’s pores, then catching food, causing it to stick. Don’t worry, after a few minutes the heat will increase and the pan will return to temperature. Small pieces may stick (creating delicious chunks of fondness), but the bulk of the protein will release naturally.

Grilled salmon with lemon and garlic sauce

Make restaurant-quality grilled salmon at home using these simple techniques and finish it with a delicious lemon-garlic butter sauce.

Preparation time 20 minutes

Cooking time 15 minutes

total time35 mins

4 servings

Entrance path

American food

Ingredients

Grilled salmon (with skin)

  • ▢1 pound whole salmon fillets, skinned, cut in half if possible
  • ▢kosher salt, as needed for seasoning
  • ▢Black pepper, as needed for seasoning
  • ▢ 2 tablespoons olive oil, light olive oil, grape seeds, avocado oil, or vegetable oil

Grilled salmon (without skin)

  • ▢ 1 pound whole salmon fillets, skin removed, halved if possible
  • ▢kosher salt, as needed for seasoning
  • ▢Black pepper, as needed for seasoning
  • ▢ 2 tablespoons olive oil, light olive oil, grape seeds, avocado oil, or vegetable oil

Lemon and garlic butter sauce

  • ▢1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • ▢1 teaspoon lemon peel
  • ▢Half a cup of lemon juice
  • ▢½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ▢Half a teaspoon of black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ▢1 tablespoon dill leaves, roughly chopped
  • ▢1 tablespoon minced parsley
  • ▢4 pcs lemon

American custom measurement

directions

Grilled salmon (with skin)

  1. Use the top of the knife (spine) to remove the scales from the slices if they are still intact. Slide the knife at a 45-degree angle over the skin to loosen and remove the scales.
  2. Cut salmon into 4 equal-sized fillets, about 2 inches wide, and 6 ounces in weight, if not already divided.
  3. Dry both sides of the salmon and the skin well with paper towels.
  4. Just before cooking, season both sides of the salmon with salt and pepper.
  5. Heat a 12-inch stainless steel, cast iron, or nonstick skillet over medium heat until heated through, about 2 minutes. Add olive oil and then turn up the heat over medium-high heat. Once the oil starts shimmering, about 1 to 2 minutes, carefully add the salmon, skin-side down, one at a time. Using the back of a spoon, immediately press the fish down into the pan for about 10 seconds. This will help reduce skin torsion. Add the remaining slices to the pan, pressing each slice down before adding the next. Reduce the heat to medium. Cook the salmon, occasionally pressing down on the meat, until the skin is browned and crunchy, and comes loose easily from the skillet, about 5 to 6 minutes. Salmon will be 75 to 80% cooked.
  6. Use tongs to carefully flip the salmon over. Gently tap the surface to make direct contact with the pan, and do not move the slices. Cook until surface is golden brown, edges are opaque, and center is slightly translucent, about 1 to 2 minutes. The internal temperature should read 120 degrees Fahrenheit (49 degrees Celsius) for the medium rarity, or 130 degrees Fahrenheit (54 degrees Celsius) for the medium.
  7. Transfer the salmon to a plate lined with a paper towel to drain excess grease. Do not discard the skillet.

Grilled salmon (without skin)

  1. Use a paring knife to carefully remove the skin from the salmon if it is still intact. Cut salmon into 4 equal-sized fillets, about 2 inches wide, and 6 ounces in weight, if not already divided.
  2. Dry the salmon surface and skin well with paper towels.
  3. Just before cooking, season both sides of the salmon with salt and pepper.
  4. Heat a 12-inch stainless steel, cast iron, or nonstick skillet over medium heat until heated through, about 2 minutes. Add olive oil and then turn up the heat over medium-high heat. Once the oil starts shimmering, about 1 to 2 minutes, carefully add the salmon one at a time, meat side down. Using the back of a spoon, immediately press the fish down into the pan for about 10 seconds. Add the remaining slices to the pan, pressing each slice down before adding the next. Reduce the heat to medium. Cook the salmon, occasionally pressing down on the pulp, until the surface is golden, crunchy, and easy to release from the skillet, about 4 to 5 minutes. Salmon will be 75 to 80% cooked.
  5. Using tongs, carefully flip the salmon over. Gently tap the surface to make direct contact with the pan, and do not move the slices. Cook until edges are opaque and center is slightly transparent, about 1 to 2 minutes. The internal temperature should read 120 degrees Fahrenheit (49 degrees Celsius) for the medium rarity, or 130 degrees Fahrenheit (54 degrees Celsius) for the medium.
  6. Transfer the salmon to a plate lined with a paper towel to drain excess grease. Do not discard the skillet.

Lemon and garlic butter sauce

  1. Heat the same skillet used for cooking salmon over medium heat. Add garlic and lemon peel and sauté for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add lemon juice, ½ teaspoon salt, and ½ teaspoon black pepper. Stir and cook for 1 minute. Put out the fire. Beat the butter until a slightly thick emulsion forms.
  2. Add salmon back to skillet, garnish with dill leaves and parsley, then pour with lemon-garlic sauce. Serve salmon with lemon slices.

tools

  • Pan
  • fish spoon

Notes

  • Four 6-ounce fillets can be used in place of whole salmon fillets. Grocery stores often sell sliced, cleaned slices.
  • If salmon fillets are thicker than 1 inch, adjust cooking time as needed to reach desired doneness.

 

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